FAQs


Our teachers come from all parts of Europe – our mother tongue teachers are all native speakers. As we have 17 mother tongues in the school, this brings about a great deal of diversity. We offer a truly international education experience.

There are many day trips to places of educational interest in a wide range of areas. Sometimes, they take place in the local area and are done on foot, but there are also many trips to museums in Amsterdam, visits to plays and concerts, and collaborative work with pupils from other schools. There are also residential trips both in the Netherlands and abroad. The school also participates in all the international events in languages, sciences and sports organised by the European Schools.

During music lessons, pupils are exposed to a range of different instruments. Although the majority of pupils have music lessons outside school, partly because of where they live, there are also some opportunities to learn an instrument through the Extra-Curricular Programme organised by the parents.

There are musicals and plays that are staged in the school. Pupils participate in interesting projects relating to Art and Design both in and out of the school. Sports are also well catered for, with possibilities for a course in Advanced Sport in the last two years. Extra-curricular activities are organised by the Parents Association.

Mathematics is taught to a high level. As a result of our connections with the Research Centre in Petten, our focus on the sciences is strong. The sciences are very popular at the school. For the Baccalaureate, all three sciences are very popular options.

The most popular Language 2 is English, and the standard is very high. In French and German, it sometimes depends on the previous knowledge of pupils, but all will have to reach a very high level by the time they take the final examinations. It is expected that the pupils reach C1 and C2 levels by the time they leave the school.

They are very important. From the beginning of the primary cycle, the second language (L2) is introduced. Later on in the secondary cycle, subjects such as History and Geography are taught in the second language. Also at the beginning of the secondary cycle, pupils begin with a third language (L3), and later have the chance to choose a fourth language (L4) and Latin, subject to numbers and availability.

Yes. We will do everything we can to integrate new pupils, and as many of our families are very mobile, we can be flexible with starting and leaving points.

There are opportunities for pupils who need extra help, or who are new to the school and do not have all the language skills required. Pupils are evaluated at the start of the year. Pupils with more intensive support needs follow a different procedure.

The decision rests with the director. In practice, changes can and do happen, but they need to be for valid educational reasons. Our first principle is that we have to put the interests of the pupil first.

Some children stay for the whole of their education, some stay for several years depending on the work and job contracts of parents. New pupils settle into our school quickly.

Around 50% of our pupils live in the Bergen and Alkmaar areas. Others live further away in villages and towns in the region, and about 20% travel from the Amsterdam area. Many of the local pupils come by bicycle. There are minibus and taxi services for pupils who come from further away. The school is also accessible by public transport.

The school is open for Dutch pupils and about 40% of our pupils have Dutch nationality. They may be Dutch children who grew up abroad, or have one Dutch parent, or they come from local Dutch families in the area. For Dutch pupils, the school is the equivalent of VWO.

Pupils begin in the nursery school from the age of 4, join the primary school from 6 and the secondary school at 11. Pupils do the final Baccalaureate exams at the age of 18-19. Younger children (2-4 years old) can join the crèche, called “Little Europe”.

Our pupils are able to return to the national system at the right level, and our official table of equivalence guarantees this. Our pupils leave with the skills required for the national systems, but they also have a high level of languages.

Most of our graduates go on to higher education – many of them to the U.K. – where a lot of them succeed in getting places at top universities. A number also go to Dutch universities. Some return to the universities in their home countries, and others are successful in getting places in the USA and other countries.

The EB and our curriculum are recognised throughout the European Union as equivalent to the national system, and this makes it easy for pupils to transfer in and out at any stage of their education.

The EB is a qualification unique to the European Schools and it offers the examinations in different languages. There are similarities with the IB, but the IB is much more focused around subjects taught in the English language. IB does not offer the same variety of mother tongue tuition or subjects taught in other EU languages. At ESB, we offer a complete curriculum in English, French and Dutch.

The EB is the leaving qualification for the European Schools, officially recognised by the member-states of the EU. It comes at the end of a two-year programme that allows pupils to enter higher education, college or university. As it is a two-year programme, students cannot join the school just for the final year, unless they are transferring from another European School. The pass rate in the EB is between 95-100%, and if a pupil fails they usually repeat the year and are succesful.

Depending on the age and level of the pupil, communication with the teachers can range from meetings and emails to digital monitoring. There are systems in place for homework and attendance monitoring by parents in the secondary school cycle.

It is possible for parents to enrol their children in the child-care service before and after school arranged by AllesKits. Children younger than 4 years old can also be enrolled in our crèche.

Our pupils come from a variety of places in the Netherlands, including Amsterdam. There are various organised transport services. The school can also be reached by public transport.

The official school day is from 09:00-16:30 from Monday to Friday, but younger pupils have shorter days (until 13:10) on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, depending on the group they are in.

Many classes are below 20, and the maximum class size is 30.

There are places available in all sections and at all levels at our school in the Netherlands. We have a large building with many facilities. There are currently no waiting lists. If you are interested in providing your children with an international education, we encourage you to apply.

Category I: Pupils who have to be admitted to the European Schools because their parents work for a European Union institution. These pupils are exempt from school fees.

Category II: Pupils covered by individual agreements or decisions, each entailing specific rights and obligations for the pupils concerned, particularly as regards school fees.

Category III: Pupils who do not belong to categories I and II. These pupils are admitted to the European Schools in so far as places are available. The ordinary school fees, fixed by the Board of Governors, would be payable for these pupils.

In an international school, there is one working language, with other languages taught as foreign languages. In a European School like ours, the curriculum is delivered in different languages and it can meet the needs of children from many different backgrounds. ESB focuses on a truly international education, by offering a European experience and several languages.

Yes. We will do everything we can to integrate new pupils, and as many of our families are very mobile, we can be flexible with starting and leaving points.

The decision rests with the director. In practice, changes can and do happen, but they need to be for valid educational reasons. Our first principle is that we have to put the interests of the pupil first.

Around 50% of our pupils live in the Bergen and Alkmaar areas. Others live further away in villages and towns in the region, and about 20% travel from the Amsterdam area. Many of the local pupils come by bicycle. There are minibus and taxi services for pupils who come from further away. The school is also accessible by public transport.

The school is open for Dutch pupils and about 40% of our pupils have Dutch nationality. They may be Dutch children who grew up abroad, or have one Dutch parent, or they come from local Dutch families in the area. For Dutch pupils, the school is the equivalent of VWO.

Pupils begin in the nursery school from the age of 4, join the primary school from 6 and the secondary school at 11. Pupils do the final Baccalaureate exams at the age of 18-19. Younger children (2-4 years old) can join the crèche, called “Little Europe”.

Our pupils come from a variety of places in the Netherlands, including Amsterdam. There are various organised transport services. The school can also be reached by public transport.

Many classes are below 20, and the maximum class size is 30.

There are places available in all sections and at all levels at our school in the Netherlands. We have a large building with many facilities. There are currently no waiting lists. If you are interested in providing your children with an international education, we encourage you to apply.

Category I: Pupils who have to be admitted to the European Schools because their parents work for a European Union institution. These pupils are exempt from school fees.

Category II: Pupils covered by individual agreements or decisions, each entailing specific rights and obligations for the pupils concerned, particularly as regards school fees.

Category III: Pupils who do not belong to categories I and II. These pupils are admitted to the European Schools in so far as places are available. The ordinary school fees, fixed by the Board of Governors, would be payable for these pupils.

There are many day trips to places of educational interest in a wide range of areas. Sometimes, they take place in the local area and are done on foot, but there are also many trips to museums in Amsterdam, visits to plays and concerts, and collaborative work with pupils from other schools. There are also residential trips both in the Netherlands and abroad. The school also participates in all the international events in languages, sciences and sports organised by the European Schools.

In the primary cycle, pupils are exposed to the Dutch language through European Hours, and in the general working of the school. In S1, they can choose Dutch as L3, and in S4, Dutch is offered as L4. In the Baccalaureate years, they can also do Dutch as L2.

When the pupils come to the school, they are enrolled in one of the language sections. We offer English, Dutch and French language sections. The pupil does most of the work in this section. For most of the pupils, the language of the section becomes their Language 1 (L1) unless they have an L1 that is not the language of a section (for example, a pupil who has L1 Polish and L2 English, and is in the English section).

They are very important. From the beginning of the primary cycle, the second language (L2) is introduced. Later on in the secondary cycle, subjects such as History and Geography are taught in the second language. Also at the beginning of the secondary cycle, pupils begin with a third language (L3), and later have the chance to choose a fourth language (L4) and Latin, subject to numbers and availability.

There are opportunities for pupils who need extra help, or who are new to the school and do not have all the language skills required. Pupils are evaluated at the start of the year. Pupils with more intensive support needs follow a different procedure.

Around 50% of our pupils live in the Bergen and Alkmaar areas. Others live further away in villages and towns in the region, and about 20% travel from the Amsterdam area. Many of the local pupils come by bicycle. There are minibus and taxi services for pupils who come from further away. The school is also accessible by public transport.

Pupils begin in the nursery school from the age of 4, join the primary school from 6 and the secondary school at 11. Pupils do the final Baccalaureate exams at the age of 18-19. Younger children (2-4 years old) can join the crèche, called “Little Europe”.

There is a homework policy in both the primary and secondary cycles. In the secondary cycle, the amount of homework gradually increases and is intended to support learning.

Depending on the age and level of the pupil, communication with the teachers can range from meetings and emails to digital monitoring. There are systems in place for homework and attendance monitoring by parents in the secondary school cycle.

It is possible for parents to enrol their children in the child-care service before and after school arranged by AllesKits. Children younger than 4 years old can also be enrolled in our crèche.

Our pupils come from a variety of places in the Netherlands, including Amsterdam. There are various organised transport services. The school can also be reached by public transport.

The official school day is from 09:00-16:30 from Monday to Friday, but younger pupils have shorter days (until 13:10) on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, depending on the group they are in.

Many classes are below 20, and the maximum class size is 30.

Our teachers come from all parts of Europe – our mother tongue teachers are all native speakers. As we have 17 mother tongues in the school, this brings about a great deal of diversity. We offer a truly international education experience.

The most popular Language 2 is English, and the standard is very high. In French and German, it sometimes depends on the previous knowledge of pupils, but all will have to reach a very high level by the time they take the final examinations. It is expected that the pupils reach C1 and C2 levels by the time they leave the school.

In the primary cycle, pupils are exposed to the Dutch language through European Hours, and in the general working of the school. In S1, they can choose Dutch as L3, and in S4, Dutch is offered as L4. In the Baccalaureate years, they can also do Dutch as L2.

The languages offered as Language 2 are the three working languages of the European Union: French, German or English. Pupils have to do a second language that is different from their Language 1. Dutch can be studied as Language 2 in S6 and S7 for the European Baccalaureate.

When the pupils come to the school, they are enrolled in one of the language sections. We offer English, Dutch and French language sections. The pupil does most of the work in this section. For most of the pupils, the language of the section becomes their Language 1 (L1) unless they have an L1 that is not the language of a section (for example, a pupil who has L1 Polish and L2 English, and is in the English section).

They are very important. From the beginning of the primary cycle, the second language (L2) is introduced. Later on in the secondary cycle, subjects such as History and Geography are taught in the second language. Also at the beginning of the secondary cycle, pupils begin with a third language (L3), and later have the chance to choose a fourth language (L4) and Latin, subject to numbers and availability.

The decision rests with the director. In practice, changes can and do happen, but they need to be for valid educational reasons. Our first principle is that we have to put the interests of the pupil first.

Our pupils are able to return to the national system at the right level, and our official table of equivalence guarantees this. Our pupils leave with the skills required for the national systems, but they also have a high level of languages.

In an international school, there is one working language, with other languages taught as foreign languages. In a European School like ours, the curriculum is delivered in different languages and it can meet the needs of children from many different backgrounds. ESB focuses on a truly international education, by offering a European experience and several languages.

Mathematics is taught to a high level. As a result of our connections with the Research Centre in Petten, our focus on the sciences is strong. The sciences are very popular at the school. For the Baccalaureate, all three sciences are very popular options.

The languages offered as Language 2 are the three working languages of the European Union: French, German or English. Pupils have to do a second language that is different from their Language 1. Dutch can be studied as Language 2 in S6 and S7 for the European Baccalaureate.

Most of our graduates go on to higher education – many of them to the U.K. – where a lot of them succeed in getting places at top universities. A number also go to Dutch universities. Some return to the universities in their home countries, and others are successful in getting places in the USA and other countries.

The EB and our curriculum are recognised throughout the European Union as equivalent to the national system, and this makes it easy for pupils to transfer in and out at any stage of their education.

The EB is a qualification unique to the European Schools and it offers the examinations in different languages. There are similarities with the IB, but the IB is much more focused around subjects taught in the English language. IB does not offer the same variety of mother tongue tuition or subjects taught in other EU languages. At ESB, we offer a complete curriculum in English, French and Dutch.

The EB is the leaving qualification for the European Schools, officially recognised by the member-states of the EU. It comes at the end of a two-year programme that allows pupils to enter higher education, college or university. As it is a two-year programme, students cannot join the school just for the final year, unless they are transferring from another European School. The pass rate in the EB is between 95-100%, and if a pupil fails they usually repeat the year and are succesful.

There is a homework policy in both the primary and secondary cycles. In the secondary cycle, the amount of homework gradually increases and is intended to support learning.

In an international school, there is one working language, with other languages taught as foreign languages. In a European School like ours, the curriculum is delivered in different languages and it can meet the needs of children from many different backgrounds. ESB focuses on a truly international education, by offering a European experience and several languages.

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